Tag: rock music

Stayin’ Alive: How Music Can Influence Your Medical Treatment

By Dave Price – Featured Contributor

This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me

When John Travolta first came strutting down a New York Street 40 years ago in the opening scene of Saturday Night Fever, the film that helped lunch the international disco craze, you can be sure his movements started a lot of female hearts pounding rapidly.

But probably no one watching could have realized that four decades later that the tune providing the beat for Travolta’s sexy, swaggering strut – “Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees – would someday be used to get hearts actually beating again and help restore life.

According to officials at New York’s Presbyterian Hospital, select rhythmic songs can help first responders and people trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation administer hands-on CPR at the proper speed needed for it to be successful. For that to happen, each compression on the chest of a victim needs to be at about 100 beats a minute.

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Classic Rockers Talk About Rock Life in the 60s/70s

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By Dave Price — Senior Writer

This article 1st appeared in Booming Encore

Mickey Dolenz vividly recalls the first time he realized he wasn’t just an actor playing a rock and roll drummer on TV anymore, but a full-fledged rock star.

It was December of 1966 and he had been working seven days a week acting on the new hit series The Monkees.  At nights, he and is bandmates Davy Jones, Mike Nesmith, and Peter Tork had been rehearsing and recording vocal parts for the new made-for-TV American group based loosely on The Beatles.

“It was really a crazy commitment. We had been almost incommunicado for three months,” Dolenz explained.

With Christmas approaching, he needed to get a few presents for friends and family. So during a brief hiatus, he drove to a nearby Hollywood mall to engage in some holiday shopping.

As he walked in the doors, he suddenly witnessed dozens of shrieking girls rushing toward him.

‘I saw all these people screaming and running and I thought at first there was a fire. Then I realized they were coming after me. I had to get back in my car and drive off.  I had never seen anything like that before,” Dolenz says.

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For Eric Burdon, Singing Is Still a Spiritual Sound

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By Dave Price

This article 1st appeared in Booming Encore

At age 75, he may need some assistance from a cane and the strong left arm of a loving wife to get from the dressing room to the backstage area. But once he hears the music and strides onto that stage he prowls. He growls. He moans and he howls.

He becomes the iconic, irascible Eric Burdon, the Hall of Fame rock and roll blues belter, who for more than four decades has been the voice of the much-beloved British Invasion band The Animals.

Recently, Burdon and the latest members of the Animals (all of whom were still more than two decades from being born when Burdon started his series of hits with “The House of the Rising Sun” in 1964), headlined the Flower Power music cruise, a five-day floating Summer of Love music festival sailing around the Caribbean.

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Woodstock with Waves: Why Music Cruises Are A Big Hit with Baby Boomers

By Dave Price

This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me

If you’re a Baby Boomer who still loves the music of your youth and also sailing the Caribbean, then music cruises may be for you!

One of the fastest growing trends in the cruise industry is themed excursions and those offering floating music festivals at sea are among today’s top sellers. Although music has always been part of the cruising – think the orchestra on The Love Boat – today’s music offerings aren’t anything like those Lawrence Welk days of yore.

Today, you can cruise for five to seven days with classic rock era bands and artists ranging from Chubby Checker to the Beach Boys to Herman’s Hermits to Yes to America to Peter Frampton providing the live soundtrack for your sea travels.

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If 2016 Had a Theme Song, It Would Be ‘All Things Must Pass’

By Dave Price

1st Published in Booming Encore

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Under a somber November sky, as they waited for the plane arriving into Washington from Dallas, author Mary McGrory turned to then presidential aide, later-to-be Senator from New York Daniel Patrick Moynihan and famously said: “We’ll never laugh again.”

“Oh Mary,” Monihayn replied. “We’ll laugh again, but we’ll never be young again.”

While McGrory and Moynihan were talking about the tragic 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the sentiments expressed seem equally appropriate for so many of us Baby Boomers as we look back on 2016, a brutish year for music which claimed so many performers who had provided us with the soundtracks for our lives.

In fact, it seemed at times that 2016’s main intent was to drive home the fact that while the music of our younger days might last forever, the musicians who created it wouldn’t.

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63-Year-Old Punk-Pop Star Cyndi Lauper Still Having Fun Singing, Supporting Feminism

This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me

A little more than three decades ago, singer Cyndi Lauper told us that girls just want to have fun. Today, at age 63, Lauper is teaching us that mature women can still have a good time.

She also says that they can continue speaking out on important social issues such as gender, sexuality, and aging, as well as establishing a strikingly personal sense of beauty and fashion.

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Cyndi Lauper
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Sweet Sounds from the Street

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Street music can be really sweet music.

The other day, my wife and I took the MARTA to the Woodruff Center for the Arts here in Atlanta, where our granddaughter would be singing and acting in a series of fractured fairy tales as the culminating activity for her 2-week performance camp at the Alliance Theater.

Now just outside the Arts Center MARTA station sits a brightly decorated piano, which is part of a summer exhibition at the nearby High Museum of Art. Any passersby are encouraged to stop and play, something I had done on a few occasions.

Emerging from the MARTA station, I heard some emotion-filled music. Since we were early for our granddaughter’s performance, I stopped to listen. After several minutes, I approached the pianist, complimented him on his playing, and asked if we could chat.

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