Tag: nonfiction writing

JFK at 100: A Vision Still Unfilled

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By Dave Price – Senior Writer

This article 1st appeared in Booming Encore

It doesn’t seem possible, but if President John F. Kennedy were alive, he would be turning 100 at the end of this month.

In one of America’s most altering moments, President Kennedy was assassinated on a sunny day in Dallas in November, 1963. But more than just a jarring presidential personal loss, there are many who maintain that a sense of American innocence and optimism also died that day with its young 35th president.

Since then, thoughts of Kennedy, who will be forever linked to the rise of the Baby Boomer generation, has generated wistful reminiscences of his vitality and calls for unselfish change for a nation.

Obviously, Kennedy’s iconic status means that 2017 will be full of special events, programs, and new books on his life, legacy, and legend. One of the most anticipated books, JFK: A Vision for America in Words and Pictures, is a huge compendium of Kennedy’s most important, brilliant speeches, accompanied by short essays offering commentary and reflections by some of America’s leading political thinkers, top historians, preeminent writers and artists, and world leaders like the Dali Lama.

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Men’s Challenges with Aging: Blame John Wayne

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By Dave Price – Senior Writer

This article 1st appeared in Booming Encore

If you are or know a male Baby Boomer who is having an extremely hard time aging, there’s a good chance that the Waynes – or more specifically, John Wayne and Bruce “Batman” Wayne – may be greatly to blame.

While it’s true that the idea of what exactly is a man has been changing over recent decades, much of the sense of masculinity in the mid-20th Century was established and reinforced through the codes of western movies and their stars such as John Wayne and the behavior of then-contemporary fictional heroes such as Batman and James Bond.

Here’s a look at five of those you-must-be-this-to-be-a-real-man concepts which were integral parts of the portrayal of the alpha male embedded in the entertainment of the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, the early shaping decades for Baby Boomers.

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The Great Story of … Wait … I Forgot What Is Was

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By Dave Price

This article 1st appeared in Booming Encore

As a new member of the Over 65 Club, I think everyone younger than me (and that’s a whole lot of people) should come up with a plan to remember things. In fact, I strongly suggest you design that plan as soon as you finish reading this article.

That way, you won’t forget.

Now I know what many of you are saying: I don’t need a plan … my memory will always stay sharp and focused. Well, I felt that way once, too. But I was so much younger then – say like 63 or 64.

Now however, like the Ancient Mariner of the famous Samuel Taylor Coleridge poem or the lone surviving whaler called Ishmael in the classic novel Moby Dick, I have returned to offer you a warning.

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Living Where You Love Vs. Living Near Your Grandkids

By Dave Price

This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me

Recently, Judy, my wife of 44 years, and I experienced a difficult family situation probably best captured by a rephrasing of the oft-repeated lines from the popular song by the British band The Clash – Should we stay or should we go?

Specifically, we had to decide if we were going to remain in Atlanta, Georgia, where we had moved to spend 15 months to be close to our two grandchildren, or return to the Washington, DC area, where we had lived for the previous four-and-a-half years after we retired from our regular careers in the state of New Jersey.

Of course, our situation wasn’t unique. In this contemporary world, where families relocate frequently for work or retirement, it is a dilemma faced fairly regularly. Our friends were eager to offer advice and the Internet was full of guidance. However, we both knew we would have to make the final decision.

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Speaking Blountly, Always Leave Room for Pie

Can a book talk make you hungry?

Well, if it’s the recent food forum featuring noted Atlanta chef and former Top Chef contestant Kevin Gillespie discussing Roy Blount Jr.’s new book Save Room for Pie: Food Songs and Chewy Ruminations with the author, the answer is yes.

If you’re not familiar with Blount or his work, think the regional wit of Mark Twain or a more historical, but none-the less hysterical Dave Barry.

The discussion was held in Blount’s hometown of Decatur, Georgia, where Gillespie operates Revival, one of his two wildly popular Atlanta-area restaurants.

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The Science Behind the Big Bang Theory

When it comes to the image of a southern good ole boy, you couldn’t find one much more opposite than that of Sheldon Cooper, the extremely intelligent, rigidly logical, and completely socially inept breakout character of TV’s long-running, highly rated comedy hit “The Big Bang Theory”.

But in a ironic twist, Cooper, played by multiple Emmy winner Jim Parsons, was supposedly born and raised in Galveston, Texas, has a overly devout southern-drawling Evangelical mother, and a doting grandmother he calls by that most southern of sobriquets “Mee-Maw”.

For those few who aren’t familiar with the show, it revolves around the antics of Cooper and three other brilliant young scientists whose geekiness and intellect are contrasted for laughs with the social skills and common sense of the women they encounter in their lives.

However,  the real co-star of the show, after humor, is the actual science employed on every episode.

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