Tag: generations

Sewing the Seeds from One Generation to Another

 

This article 1st appeared in Medium

As a writer on social media, you never really know what will impact your audience. For example, a recent post on my Facebook page set a personal page page record for likes in just two days. The entry contained the above two pictures plus the simple line — Audrey made this dress with some help from her grandmother. So pretty!

The post recorded 161 likes.

But here’s the funny thing. I had absolutely nothing to do with the entry. It was posted and written by my daughter-in-law Shannon. The pictures are of my 8-year-old granddaughter. With a lot of help from my wife Judy (who, of course is also her grandmother), Audrey designed and sewed the dress displayed. The entry only appeared on my page because I was tagged in my daughter-in-law’s post.

So why did this post strike such a chord?

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When It Comes to Aging, Don’t Drop the Soap

They told me one day I would feel old, but I just refused to believe them.

Age 30. Then 40 – 50 – 60, now 64. Nope, not old.

Grey hair. White hair. Thinning hair. Definitely more hair in my ears and my nose than on the growing bald spot on the back of my head. Still didn’t feel old. Besides, that’s what small scissors are for.

An expanding stomach. Creaking bones. Getting up at night to pee. Still no significant difference.

Hey, I thought, maybe I’m impervious to aging and its supposed ravagings.

But then today all that changed.

I had to face the fact that maybe I really am old.

What happened, you ask?

Well, I still use bar soap.

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You’re Not Over the Hill Until You Believe You’re Over the Hill

This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me

How old is really old?

Apparently, the answer depends on the age of the person responding to the question.

Intuitively, this makes sense. Take a moment and think back to when you were 15. How did you view a person who was 20? Now return to your current mindset. How do you view a person who is 5 years older than you today?

Well we now have research data to support the concept that age is relative.

The AARP recently conducted a survey on different generations’ views on aging and what exactly constitutes being old.

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My Grandson Meets His New Uncle Gary

uncle-gary

As clichéd as it may sound it’s still true – little things do mean a lot.

For a Father’s Day long-weekend, my son Michael and I decided to take my 7-year-old grandson, Owen, on a 3-generation baseball game tour to 3 cities – Washington, D.C., Baltimore, and Philadelphia where we would get to see the Nationals, the Orioles, and the Phillies play, as well as visit a few local attractions.

In Baltimore, we were staying at the Renaissance Hotel in the Inner Harbor section of the city.

While Michael was checking in, Owen and I were approached by Gary Shivers, a bell

man with the reception department.

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Babysitting Boosts Your Brain Power

This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me

When my wife and I babysat our two grandchildren this past weekend, we knew we would have fun. But we didn’t know we would be boosting our brain power as well.A Little Babysitting Is Great for You…

A report from Australia shows that moderate babysitting of grandchildren reduces chances of developing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

The study, which has been published by the official journal of the North American Menopause Society, followed 120 grandparents in Australia. It found that those that babysat one day each week scored higher on a range of cognitive tests.

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Communing with the Spirits of the Past, Present, and Future

audrey-hands-folded

Yesterday was the first of what I hope will be many special days in the spiritual development of my granddaughter Audrey. She celebrated her First Holy Communion in the All Saints Catholic Church.

Now I have no idea how Audrey’s relationship to her spiritual life will turn out. Neither does she, for she’s only 8 years old. Audrey may be like her great-grandmother Price and become an avid churchgoer and true Christian, exemplifying the teachings of Jesus Christ in every aspect of her life. She may decide to be more like her Nana Sullivan, a believer in God who goes to church, but doesn’t accept all the tenets of the Catholic faith. Or she may opt to follow her father, her grandmother Price, and myself, all of whom were raised in the Methodist Church but elected to reject regular church going as a requisite to living a good life on Earth. Or, of course, she may choose some other way.

But no matter which path Audrey heads down, I think it’s important that all young Americans receive an understanding of Christianity.

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Requiem: A Few Thoughts on the Passing of Old Friends

It comes with aging.

As happens more and more frequently since I have entered my 7th decade, two big pieces of the once-completed puzzle of my teenage years have been removed.

Last week, I learned that Bucky Hayes, whom I had known since grade school, had died in his current Tennessee town. A few days after, I found out that George McLaughlin, my 11th-grade history teacher and later fellow teaching colleague at our hometown Bridgeton (NJ) high school, had passed away.

Obviously, as with the deaths of all people whom we know well, there comes a sense of sadness with the finality of their passing. However, today I’m much more grateful than sad since I can keep the memories and lessons I learned from them forever, or at least until the time of my own passing.

At a cursory glance, Henry Allen, or Bucky as everyone called him, and Mr. McLaughlin (or George as I later came to call him) couldn’t have been more different.

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