Stayin’ Alive: How Music Can Influence Your Medical Treatment

By Dave Price – Featured Contributor

This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me

When John Travolta first came strutting down a New York Street 40 years ago in the opening scene of Saturday Night Fever, the film that helped lunch the international disco craze, you can be sure his movements started a lot of female hearts pounding rapidly.

But probably no one watching could have realized that four decades later that the tune providing the beat for Travolta’s sexy, swaggering strut – “Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees – would someday be used to get hearts actually beating again and help restore life.

According to officials at New York’s Presbyterian Hospital, select rhythmic songs can help first responders and people trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation administer hands-on CPR at the proper speed needed for it to be successful. For that to happen, each compression on the chest of a victim needs to be at about 100 beats a minute.

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Reflecting on the Puzzle Pieces That Make Up My Life

By Dave Price – Senior Writer

This article 1st appeared in Booming Encore

As is happening much more frequently as I get older, death has removed two more big pieces of the interlocking personal jigsaw puzzle that depicts my younger, pre-adult years.

In the last week of May, former Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Jim Bunning died at age 85 in his home state of Kentucky, where after his professional baseball career he served as both a member of the House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

One day later, death claimed Gregg Allman, the 69-year-old singer and Hammond B-3 organ player for the hugely popular Southern rock jam band the Allman Brothers, which was founded in 1969 by his brother, the legendary rock guitarist Duane Allman.

Bunning and Allman represented two of my major early passions – sports and rock music. And both had provided a special personal bond for members of my family and me.

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How Being Messy Can Transform Your Life for the Better

By Dave Price – Featured Contributor

This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me

If you know the nursery rhyme story of Jack Sprat and his wife, then you have an idea of the relationship my wife of 44 years, Judy, and I have. If you’re not familiar with the child’s poem, here is the first stanza:

Jack Sprat could eat no fat,
His wife could eat no lean.
And so betwixt the two of them,
They licked the platter clean.

As you can see, Jack and his wife are a husband and wife with quite differing, opposite tastes. However, by combining those complementary preferences, they are able to “lick the platter clean” – that is, experience complete success.

Judy and I are a lot like that. We have generally similar interests. But within those interest categories, we have very differing approaches and penchants. But we have learned to accept and enjoy those differences and have come to believe that they make us a better couple.

But there are exceptions.

How Clean is Too Clean?

One of our longest-running disputes involves household (or now apartment) cleanliness.

Judy is tidy. I am untidy. Judy is well-ordered. I am messy. Judy is a neatnik. I am a scruffie. Judy straightens up several times a day. I would clean once every week or so. You get the picture.

Of course, Judy believes her way is best. I counter that even if I did agree, I am constitutionally incapable of achieving her impossible standard of neatness so why should I try.

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JFK at 100: A Vision Still Unfilled

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By Dave Price – Senior Writer

This article 1st appeared in Booming Encore

It doesn’t seem possible, but if President John F. Kennedy were alive, he would be turning 100 at the end of this month.

In one of America’s most altering moments, President Kennedy was assassinated on a sunny day in Dallas in November, 1963. But more than just a jarring presidential personal loss, there are many who maintain that a sense of American innocence and optimism also died that day with its young 35th president.

Since then, thoughts of Kennedy, who will be forever linked to the rise of the Baby Boomer generation, has generated wistful reminiscences of his vitality and calls for unselfish change for a nation.

Obviously, Kennedy’s iconic status means that 2017 will be full of special events, programs, and new books on his life, legacy, and legend. One of the most anticipated books, JFK: A Vision for America in Words and Pictures, is a huge compendium of Kennedy’s most important, brilliant speeches, accompanied by short essays offering commentary and reflections by some of America’s leading political thinkers, top historians, preeminent writers and artists, and world leaders like the Dali Lama.

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Men’s Challenges with Aging: Blame John Wayne

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By Dave Price – Senior Writer

This article 1st appeared in Booming Encore

If you are or know a male Baby Boomer who is having an extremely hard time aging, there’s a good chance that the Waynes – or more specifically, John Wayne and Bruce “Batman” Wayne – may be greatly to blame.

While it’s true that the idea of what exactly is a man has been changing over recent decades, much of the sense of masculinity in the mid-20th Century was established and reinforced through the codes of western movies and their stars such as John Wayne and the behavior of then-contemporary fictional heroes such as Batman and James Bond.

Here’s a look at five of those you-must-be-this-to-be-a-real-man concepts which were integral parts of the portrayal of the alpha male embedded in the entertainment of the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, the early shaping decades for Baby Boomers.

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4 Quick, Simple Ways to Make Your Home Safer for Your Grandkids

This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me

By Dave Price — Featured Contibutor

In retrospect, it was some of our scariest minutes as parents of a then three-year-old.

The experience began innocently enough when my wife Judy, our son Michael, and I visited my mother’s house on a warm spring day in 1976.

Judy and I were in the family room talking to my mother. Because Michael spent quite a bit of time at my mother’s, he had a playroom down the hall, where he immediately headed to play with his toys. Or at least that is what I thought.

After about five minutes, I headed to the playroom to check on Michael. But he wasn’t there. I heard him down the hall in my mother’s bedroom. Entering the room, I found him standing next to an open pill bottle. Pills were scattered over the floor.

Fearing the worst, I hollered for my mother and Judy. They rushed to the bedroom. Judy and I bent down to talk to Michael.

“Did you take any of these pills?” we asked him, trying to keep any tone of terror from our voices.

“No, Mommy,” he said. “I was trying to reach that brush there and the bottle fell over. I’m sorry.”

Judy grabbed the pill bottle from the floor and headed hurriedly down the hallway to call our pediatrician.

I hugged Michael and said, “Mommy, Grand mom, and I aren’t mad. We just need to know. Are you sure you didn’t take any of those pills?” I said, pointing to the scattered collection of capsules on the floor.

“No, Daddy,” he said.

Judy reentered the room. “Dr. Varga said we shouldn’t worry, but we should go to the emergency room just to be sure,” she whispered to me.

After a tense drive to the hospital and about 90 minutes of observation in the emergency room, the doctor on duty assured us that Michael was telling the truth. If he had ingested any of the pills and they were to cause any harmful effects, it would have happened by now.

Before leaving the hospital, we called my mother. You could almost feel her relief rush through the phone lines.

Now, the moral of this tale is that even the greatest grandparents (and believe me, my mother was definitely in that category) can never be too careful. But still, accidents can – and do – happen.

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Classic Rockers Talk About Rock Life in the 60s/70s

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By Dave Price — Senior Writer

This article 1st appeared in Booming Encore

Mickey Dolenz vividly recalls the first time he realized he wasn’t just an actor playing a rock and roll drummer on TV anymore, but a full-fledged rock star.

It was December of 1966 and he had been working seven days a week acting on the new hit series The Monkees.  At nights, he and is bandmates Davy Jones, Mike Nesmith, and Peter Tork had been rehearsing and recording vocal parts for the new made-for-TV American group based loosely on The Beatles.

“It was really a crazy commitment. We had been almost incommunicado for three months,” Dolenz explained.

With Christmas approaching, he needed to get a few presents for friends and family. So during a brief hiatus, he drove to a nearby Hollywood mall to engage in some holiday shopping.

As he walked in the doors, he suddenly witnessed dozens of shrieking girls rushing toward him.

‘I saw all these people screaming and running and I thought at first there was a fire. Then I realized they were coming after me. I had to get back in my car and drive off.  I had never seen anything like that before,” Dolenz says.

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