Category: Life Lessons

Reflecting on the Puzzle Pieces That Make Up My Life

By Dave Price – Senior Writer

This article 1st appeared in Booming Encore

As is happening much more frequently as I get older, death has removed two more big pieces of the interlocking personal jigsaw puzzle that depicts my younger, pre-adult years.

In the last week of May, former Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Jim Bunning died at age 85 in his home state of Kentucky, where after his professional baseball career he served as both a member of the House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

One day later, death claimed Gregg Allman, the 69-year-old singer and Hammond B-3 organ player for the hugely popular Southern rock jam band the Allman Brothers, which was founded in 1969 by his brother, the legendary rock guitarist Duane Allman.

Bunning and Allman represented two of my major early passions – sports and rock music. And both had provided a special personal bond for members of my family and me.

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How Being Messy Can Transform Your Life for the Better

By Dave Price – Featured Contributor

This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me

If you know the nursery rhyme story of Jack Sprat and his wife, then you have an idea of the relationship my wife of 44 years, Judy, and I have. If you’re not familiar with the child’s poem, here is the first stanza:

Jack Sprat could eat no fat,
His wife could eat no lean.
And so betwixt the two of them,
They licked the platter clean.

As you can see, Jack and his wife are a husband and wife with quite differing, opposite tastes. However, by combining those complementary preferences, they are able to “lick the platter clean” – that is, experience complete success.

Judy and I are a lot like that. We have generally similar interests. But within those interest categories, we have very differing approaches and penchants. But we have learned to accept and enjoy those differences and have come to believe that they make us a better couple.

But there are exceptions.

How Clean is Too Clean?

One of our longest-running disputes involves household (or now apartment) cleanliness.

Judy is tidy. I am untidy. Judy is well-ordered. I am messy. Judy is a neatnik. I am a scruffie. Judy straightens up several times a day. I would clean once every week or so. You get the picture.

Of course, Judy believes her way is best. I counter that even if I did agree, I am constitutionally incapable of achieving her impossible standard of neatness so why should I try.

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The Pope and Science Agree: Listen to Your Grandparents


When the Pope talks, you better listen. And when he gives you homework, you best do it.

Earlier this month, Pope Francis told a group of Italian children they should frequently listen to their grandparents, ask them questions, and tell them their dreams.

“They remember history, have life experience and, for you, this will be a great gift that will help you in your journey,” the Pope told hundreds of youngsters who were members of the Catholic Action’s children section.

“I’m giving your homework,” said the 80-year-old Pontiff. “Speak often with your grandparents. They, too, have this contagious joy. Ask them lots of things, listen to them. And be sure to tell them your dreams, too.”

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Helping Kids Deal with Natural and Unnatural Violence

This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me

Recently a violent summer storm swept through the Atlanta-area community where we live near our grandchildren. My seven-year-old grandson Owen, who only a few weeks before had finally become comfortable with July 4th holiday fireworks, rushed from his bed to his parents’ room.

Earlier in the evening, there had been reports of expected high winds or even tornadoes. As the thunder pealed and the lightning flashed, the possibility of a tornado seemed paramount in Owen’s mind. For the next 15 minutes or so, he besieged his Dad with questions. “What’s a tornado again, Daddy?” “What do we do if a tornado does come? Do we hide in the basement?”

Finally, after receiving patiently delivered answers and a series of hugs, Owen fell asleep again.

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My Grandson Meets His New Uncle Gary


As clichéd as it may sound it’s still true – little things do mean a lot.

For a Father’s Day long-weekend, my son Michael and I decided to take my 7-year-old grandson, Owen, on a 3-generation baseball game tour to 3 cities – Washington, D.C., Baltimore, and Philadelphia where we would get to see the Nationals, the Orioles, and the Phillies play, as well as visit a few local attractions.

In Baltimore, we were staying at the Renaissance Hotel in the Inner Harbor section of the city.

While Michael was checking in, Owen and I were approached by Gary Shivers, a bell

man with the reception department.

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Passing On Your Family’s History to Your Grandkids

This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me


 Of all the gifts that grandparents can give their grandchildren, few are grander than a sense of where they fit in to the history of their family.

Why do I say that?

Well, who is better positioned than grandparents to be the family griots, a term for those great African storytellers, whose job it is to be a repository of tribal history, traditions, and culture and pass them on to future generations?

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Communing with the Spirits of the Past, Present, and Future


Yesterday was the first of what I hope will be many special days in the spiritual development of my granddaughter Audrey. She celebrated her First Holy Communion in the All Saints Catholic Church.

Now I have no idea how Audrey’s relationship to her spiritual life will turn out. Neither does she, for she’s only 8 years old. Audrey may be like her great-grandmother Price and become an avid churchgoer and true Christian, exemplifying the teachings of Jesus Christ in every aspect of her life. She may decide to be more like her Nana Sullivan, a believer in God who goes to church, but doesn’t accept all the tenets of the Catholic faith. Or she may opt to follow her father, her grandmother Price, and myself, all of whom were raised in the Methodist Church but elected to reject regular church going as a requisite to living a good life on Earth. Or, of course, she may choose some other way.

But no matter which path Audrey heads down, I think it’s important that all young Americans receive an understanding of Christianity.

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