Category: Grandparenting

4 Quick, Simple Ways to Make Your Home Safer for Your Grandkids

This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me

By Dave Price — Featured Contibutor

In retrospect, it was some of our scariest minutes as parents of a then three-year-old.

The experience began innocently enough when my wife Judy, our son Michael, and I visited my mother’s house on a warm spring day in 1976.

Judy and I were in the family room talking to my mother. Because Michael spent quite a bit of time at my mother’s, he had a playroom down the hall, where he immediately headed to play with his toys. Or at least that is what I thought.

After about five minutes, I headed to the playroom to check on Michael. But he wasn’t there. I heard him down the hall in my mother’s bedroom. Entering the room, I found him standing next to an open pill bottle. Pills were scattered over the floor.

Fearing the worst, I hollered for my mother and Judy. They rushed to the bedroom. Judy and I bent down to talk to Michael.

“Did you take any of these pills?” we asked him, trying to keep any tone of terror from our voices.

“No, Mommy,” he said. “I was trying to reach that brush there and the bottle fell over. I’m sorry.”

Judy grabbed the pill bottle from the floor and headed hurriedly down the hallway to call our pediatrician.

I hugged Michael and said, “Mommy, Grand mom, and I aren’t mad. We just need to know. Are you sure you didn’t take any of those pills?” I said, pointing to the scattered collection of capsules on the floor.

“No, Daddy,” he said.

Judy reentered the room. “Dr. Varga said we shouldn’t worry, but we should go to the emergency room just to be sure,” she whispered to me.

After a tense drive to the hospital and about 90 minutes of observation in the emergency room, the doctor on duty assured us that Michael was telling the truth. If he had ingested any of the pills and they were to cause any harmful effects, it would have happened by now.

Before leaving the hospital, we called my mother. You could almost feel her relief rush through the phone lines.

Now, the moral of this tale is that even the greatest grandparents (and believe me, my mother was definitely in that category) can never be too careful. But still, accidents can – and do – happen.

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Living Where You Love Vs. Living Near Your Grandkids

By Dave Price

This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me

Recently, Judy, my wife of 44 years, and I experienced a difficult family situation probably best captured by a rephrasing of the oft-repeated lines from the popular song by the British band The Clash – Should we stay or should we go?

Specifically, we had to decide if we were going to remain in Atlanta, Georgia, where we had moved to spend 15 months to be close to our two grandchildren, or return to the Washington, DC area, where we had lived for the previous four-and-a-half years after we retired from our regular careers in the state of New Jersey.

Of course, our situation wasn’t unique. In this contemporary world, where families relocate frequently for work or retirement, it is a dilemma faced fairly regularly. Our friends were eager to offer advice and the Internet was full of guidance. However, we both knew we would have to make the final decision.

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Sewing the Seeds from One Generation to Another

 

This article 1st appeared in Medium

As a writer on social media, you never really know what will impact your audience. For example, a recent post on my Facebook page set a personal page page record for likes in just two days. The entry contained the above two pictures plus the simple line — Audrey made this dress with some help from her grandmother. So pretty!

The post recorded 161 likes.

But here’s the funny thing. I had absolutely nothing to do with the entry. It was posted and written by my daughter-in-law Shannon. The pictures are of my 8-year-old granddaughter. With a lot of help from my wife Judy (who, of course is also her grandmother), Audrey designed and sewed the dress displayed. The entry only appeared on my page because I was tagged in my daughter-in-law’s post.

So why did this post strike such a chord?

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When It Comes to Grandkids, How to Turn Christmas Gifts from No-No-Nos to Ho-Ho-Hos

This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me

With less than a week left until Christmas, family members all over the world are making silent, solemn, last-minute promises to be nice and not naughty this season when they gather together to celebrate the holidays.

No time signifies the special bonds of family more than Christmas. But too often, instead of familial peace, such gatherings disintegrate into verbal free-for-alls followed by abrupt, dramatic exits.

There are almost as many culprits for these explosions as there are white whiskers in Santa’s beard. Generational conflicts. Political differences. Seasonal pressures. Too much eggnog. Grandma getting run over by a reindeer.

Why even the wonderful tradition of exchanging gifts can lead to Grinch-like misadventures.

Obviously, not all the reasons for family holiday disputes are easy to address, but in the spirit of the season, here are a few last-minute offerings for grandparents (and actually all relatives) about gifting that, if followed, should greatly reduce any potential problems in that area.

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Helping Kids Deal with Natural and Unnatural Violence

This article 1st appeared in Sixty and Me

Recently a violent summer storm swept through the Atlanta-area community where we live near our grandchildren. My seven-year-old grandson Owen, who only a few weeks before had finally become comfortable with July 4th holiday fireworks, rushed from his bed to his parents’ room.

Earlier in the evening, there had been reports of expected high winds or even tornadoes. As the thunder pealed and the lightning flashed, the possibility of a tornado seemed paramount in Owen’s mind. For the next 15 minutes or so, he besieged his Dad with questions. “What’s a tornado again, Daddy?” “What do we do if a tornado does come? Do we hide in the basement?”

Finally, after receiving patiently delivered answers and a series of hugs, Owen fell asleep again.

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My Grandson Meets His New Uncle Gary

uncle-gary

As clichéd as it may sound it’s still true – little things do mean a lot.

For a Father’s Day long-weekend, my son Michael and I decided to take my 7-year-old grandson, Owen, on a 3-generation baseball game tour to 3 cities – Washington, D.C., Baltimore, and Philadelphia where we would get to see the Nationals, the Orioles, and the Phillies play, as well as visit a few local attractions.

In Baltimore, we were staying at the Renaissance Hotel in the Inner Harbor section of the city.

While Michael was checking in, Owen and I were approached by Gary Shivers, a bell

man with the reception department.

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